Choosing A 2-A Concentration

The Course 2-A concentration consists of 72 units of upper level subjects (with the exception of the REST subject) that have a coherent focus. Students choose these subjects in consultation with the 2-A Coordinator, Professor Sangbae Kim (sangbae@mit.edu) and their advisor. A proposed course of study is developed and submitted online for review and approval. Certain restrictions do apply, and are outlined below.

Bear in mind that the 2-A program was designed to be flexible.  Many different concentrations are possible, and a student’s particular program may be unique. The tracks listed below are suggestions. Students are encouraged to design and propose technically oriented concentrations that reflect their own needs and those of society.

Use the links below to learn more about popular concentrations, specific program recommendations, approved classes, and sample schedules.

Guidelines for Concentrations

  1. Concentrations must include at least 72 units.
  2. No concentration subject may also be counted as a GIR (including HASS subjects), except one REST GIR.
  3. One Freshman-level subject, such as 1.00 or 6.00, may be included in the concentration as a REST subject; all other concentration subjects must be upper level. Need a REST?  Here’s the list.
  4. UROPs are not allowed in the concentration; however, students may include a 12 unit thesis, 2.ThU.
  5. Basic math and science subjects may not be included in the concentration.
  6. The program of study must include at least 72 units of engineering topics; all content is reviewed by the 2-A Coordinator and Undergraduate Officer.  (Engineering content can, but is not required to, overlap with the Concentration.  Extra engineering subjects can be taken to make up for any engineering content missing from the concentration.)
  7. Each concentration subject must have an obvious relationship to the overall theme of the concentration, and should be explained in the paragraph on the 2-A form.
  8. Students who take Course 2 versions of the 2-A curriculum can use 6 units of the subjects as extra engineering or in the concentration, depending on the subject (see Substitutions).
  9. Graduate courses may be counted in the concentration.

 

 

Biomechanics and Biomedical Devices

The Bio Track is the bioengineering curriculum offered by the MIT Department of Mechanical Engineering. Students pursuing this curriculum will be educated in bioengineering subjects with a strong mechanical engineering disciplinary background. The mission of the Bio Track is to prepare future leaders in biomedicine, biotechnology, and pharmaceutical industry.

The Bio Track curriculum is designed to be flexible so that the students can explore the different aspects of bioengineering. Major areas covered in this track include biomechanics, biomaterials, bioinstrumentation, and bio-inspired manufacturing. Furthermore, the Bio Track curriculum may be structured such that it is complementary to the both the biomedical engineering minor and the minor program in toxicology and environmental health. (Recall that courses in your concentration may also be counted towards your minor).

Recommended REST subjects: 2.772/20.110; REST subjects with no engineering: 5.07/7.05, 5.12

Suggested Concentration Subjects:

  • 2.184 Biomechanics and Neural Control of Movement
  • 2.673J Instrumentation and Measurement for Biological Systems
  • 2.70J FUNdaMENTALS of Precision Product Design
  • 2.772J Thermodynamics of Biomolecular Systems
  • 2.78J Principles and Practice of Assistive Technology
  • 2.782J Design of Medical Devices and Implants
  • 2.787J Tissue Engineering and Organ Regeneration
  • 2.79J Biomaterials: Tissue Interactions
  • 2.791J Cellular Biophysics
  • 2.792J Quantitative Systems Physiology
  • 2.793J Fields, Forces and Flows in Biological Systems
  • 2.797J Molecular, Cellular, and Tissue Biomechanics
  • 2.750 Precision Machine Design (may replace 2.009 by petition)
  • 6.002 Circuits and Electronics
  • 6.115 Microcomputer Project Laboratory
  • 6.131 Power Electronics Laboratory
  • 6.041 Probabilistic Systems Analysis
  • 18.650 Statistics for Applications
  • 22.071J Electronics, Signals, and Measurement

 

BME Minors

Information about the undergraduate Minor Program in Biomedical Engineering
Information about the undergraduate Minor Program in Toxicology and Environmental Health
Pre-med office’s list of recommended courses
Minor Application Form

Computing

This track allows students to learn about modeling of mechanical systems combined with topics in computing and numerical methods.

Recommended REST subjects:  6.00

Note: You may only include one introductory/REST subject in your concentration.  The following classes are introductory: 6.0001/6.00, 6.042 (REST)/18.200, 6.004 (REST), and 6.008.

Recommended Course 2 subjects

2.004 Dynamics and Control II

2.007 Design and Manufacturing I

 

Suggested Concentration Subjects

Computing

2.168 Learning Machines (GRAD) *

2.791[J] Cellular Neurophysiology and Computing

6.009 Fundamentals of Programming

6.031 Software Construction

6.033 Computer System Engineering

6.034 Artificial Intelligence

6.036 Introduction to Machine Learning

6.046J Design and Analysis of Algorithms

6.170 Software Studio

6.883 Advanced Topics in Artificial Intelligence

Controls

2.14 Analysis and Design of Feedback Control Systems

2.151 Advanced System Dynamics and Control (GRAD)

2.152[J] Nonlinear Control (GRAD)

Mathematics

2.122 Stochastic Systems (GRAD) *

2.29 Numerical Fluid Mechanics (GRAD) *

18.05 Intro to Probability & Statistics -OR- 6.041A  Intro to Probability I + 6.041B  Intro to Probability II

18.06 Linear Algebra

18.075 Methods for Scientists and Engineers

18.085 Computational Science and Engineering I

18.086 Computational Science and Engineering II

18.404 Theory of Computation

 

Control, Instrumentation and Robotics

Control, Instrumentation and Robotics or “CIR” or “2-A/6” is one of the most popular tracks in Course 2-A (Everybody loves robots!).  This track enables students to combine studies in mechanical design and control from Course 2 with circuits, electronics and programming from Course 6.  As with all 2-A tracks, there is a great deal of flexibility in designing your curriculum and most upper-level classes from course 2 and 6 may be counted in your concentration.

Recommended REST subjects: 1.00, 6.00, 6.002, 6.041, 6.071
Note: You may only include one introductory/REST subject in your concentration.  The following classes from the CS minor are introductory: 6.0001/6.00, 6.042 (REST)/18.200, 6.004 (REST), and 6.008.

Recommended Course 2 Subjects

  • 2.003 (Dynamics and Control I
  • 2.004 Dynamics and Control II

Strongly Recommended Concentration Subjects

  • 2.007 Design and Manufacturing I
  • 2.12 Introduction to Robotics
  • 2.14 Analysis and Design of Feedback Control Systems

Additional Suggested Concentration Subjects

  • 2.002 Mechanics and Materials II
  • 2.008 Design and Manufacturing II
  • 2.017J Design of Electromechanical Robotic Systems
  • 2.151 Advanced System Dynamics and Control (GRAD)
  • 2.161 Signal Processing: Continuous and Discrete (GRAD)
  • 2.673 Instrumentation and Measurement for Biological Systems
  • 2.71 Optics
  • 2.737 Mechatronics (GRAD)
  • 6.01 Introduction to EECS I
  • 6.02 Introduction to EECS II
  • 6.002 Circuits and Electronics
  • 6.003 Signals and Systems
  • 6.005 Elements of Software Construction
  • 6.034 Artificial Intelligence
  • 6.071 Electronics, Signals and Measurement
  • 6.115 Microcomputer Project Laboratory
  • 6.141J Robotics: Science and Systems I
  • 6.142J Robotics: Science and Systems II
  • 6.801 Machine Vision
  • 6.811 Assistive Technology
  • 16.30 Feedback Control Systems
  • 16.35 Real-time Systems and Software
  • 16.410 Principles of Autonomy and Decision Making

 

 

Energy Conversion Engineering

The Energy Conversion Engineering Track is designed for students who wish to gain strong foundation in mechanical engineering with greater depth in energy conversion and utilization technologies. Graduates of this track will be prepared to analyze, design and build efficient and sustainable energy systems that exploit the rapid pace of progress in the field. Conversion from different fossil, renewable and nuclear sources, utilization in transportation, residential and industrial applications, and the integration of systems while addressing the constraints, form the essence and contents of many of the courses offered in this track. By selecting appropriate classes in their concentrations, students pursuing this track may also obtain a Minor in Energy Studies (recall that courses in your concentration may also be counted towards your minor).

Suggested courses are listed below. Note that, as will any Course 2-A degree, the classes listed below are suggestions not requirements. Students are encouraged to design and propose technically oriented concentrations that reflect their own needs and those of society. The (M) annotation indicates classes that are on the approved list of courses for a Minor in Energy Studies.

Recommended REST subjects: 8.21 (M), 2.66/4.42 (M)

Recommended Course 2 Subjects

  • 2.004 Dynamics and Control II
  • 2.006 Thermal-Fluids Engineering II

Suggested Concentration Subjects

  • 2.28 Fundamentals and Applications of Combustion (GRAD)
  • 2.42 General Thermodynamics (GRAD)
  • 2.51 Intermediate Heat and Mass Transfer
  • 2.60J Fundamentals of Advanced Energy Conversion (M)
  • 2.61 Internal Combustion Engines (GRAD)
  • 2.612 Marine Power and Propulsion (M)
  • 2.625 Electrochemical Energy Conversion and Storage: Fundamentals, Materials and Applications (GRAD)
  • 2.627 Fundamentals of Photovoltaics (M)
  • 2.650J Introduction to Sustainable Energy (M)
  • 2.66J Fundamentals of Energy in Buildings (M)
  • 2.813 Energy, Materials, and Manufacturing
  • 6.007 Electromagnetic Energy: From Motors to Lasers (M)
  • 6.061 Introduction to Electrical Power Systems (M)
  • 6.131 Power Electronics Laboratory (M)
  • 10.27: Energy Engineering Projects Laboratory (M)
  • 10.426: Electrochemical Energy Systems
  • 22.05 Neutron Science and Reactor Physics
  • 22.06 Engineering of Nuclear Systems (M)

Additional resources to help you choose classes may be found here.

 

 

Engineering Management

Engineering Management Tracks can be tricky to put together because there is a fine balance that must be struck between managerial and engineering courses.  Because of this challenge, the track advisor, Professor Chun, strongly recommends that students make an appointment with him so that he can suggest appropriate courses that align with the individual student’s interests. For more information on what counts as an engineering course, see the post on Engineering Units.

Engineering Management deals with the engineering relationships between the management tasks of planning, organization, leadership, control, and the human element in production, research, and service organizations; and it also deals with the stochastic nature of management systems. Engineering management involves the integration of management systems into different technological environments.

Students pursuing the Engineering Management Track may also wish to consider a Minor in Management Science or a Minor in Management. (Recall that courses in your concentration may also be counted towards your minor).

Subjects chosen for an engineering management concentration should be consistent with the above description.  Commonly recommended engineering courses include:

Recommended REST Subject: 6.041: Probabilistic Systems Analysis

Recommended Concentration Subjects

  • 2.916: Money for Startups
  • 2.96: Management in Engineering
  • 3.080: Economic and Environmental Materials Selection
  • 15.053: Optimization Methods in Management Science
  • 15.075: Statistical Thinking and Data Analysis
  • Most courses listed under “Operations Management” (15.760 – 15.799)
  • 15.871: Introduction to System Dynamics (GRAD)
  • 15.872: System Dynamics II (GRAD)

Other strongly recommended subjects with no (or reduced) engineering content

  • 6.903J/15.628J: Patents, Copyrights, and the Law of Intellectual Property
  • 15.501: Corporate Financial Accounting — 9 engineering units
  • 15.616: Basic Businesses Law, Tilted Towards Strategy and Innovation (GRAD) — 3 engineering units
  • 15.812: Marketing Management — 3 engineering units

 

Entrepreneurship

All of us at MIT have at least one thing in common: in some way or another, we all want to make a positive impact on the world. At some point during your time at MIT, it’s most likely that you will develop a brilliant solution to a real-world problem. That’s great, but what difference are you making if it stays in your lab or dorm room?

The Entrepreneurship track has been designed to empower you with the knowledge, skills, resources, and connections you need to get your ideas off the ground, fully developed, and out to market in order to make a real-world, lasting impact. What are you waiting for?

Students pursuing the Entrepreneurship Track may also wish to consider a Minor in Management Science or a Minor in Management. (Recall that courses in your concentration may also be counted towards your minor).

Recommended Concentration Subjects with full engineering content

  • 2.008 Design & Manufacturing II
  • MAS.863J How To Make (Almost) Anything (GRAD)
  • 2.916: Money for Startups
  • 2.96 Management in Engineering
  • 6.933 Entrepreneurship in Engineering: The Founder’s Journey
  • 2.Thu Undergraduate Thesis in Mechanical Engineering
  • 6.902 Engineering Innovation and Design (GEL)

Other strongly recommended subjects with no (or reduced) engineering content

  • 11.011 The Art and Science of Negotiation (no engineering units)
  • 15.501 Corporate Financial Accounting (9 engineering units)
  • 15.812 Marketing Management (3 engineering units)
  • 14.01 Microeconomics (no engineering units)
  • 14.02 Macroeconomics (no engineering units)
  • 15.615 Basic Business Law for the Entrepreneur and Manager (GRAD)
  • 15.390 New Enterprises, or 15.371 Innovation Teams (GRAD) (engineering units may vary depending on the project)
  • 6.903J/15.628J: Patents, Copyrights, and the Law of Intellectual Property

Other recommended activities include:

  • UPOP Undergraduate Practice Opportunities Program
  • GEL Gordon Engineering Leadership Program
  • Industry Internship/Externship experiences
  • Industry classes (e.g. 15.054 The Airline Industry)
  • Mentored Entrepreneurial Experience such as
    15.S24 Applications of Advanced Entrepreneurial Techniques

 

 

Environmental Mechanics

The environmental mechanics track is for students interested in learning how the natural environment works. The curriculum emphasizes an understanding of fluid flow and chemical reactions in the atmosphere, oceans, and subsurface; the ways in these processes interact with the biosphere; and contemporary problems ofenvironmental change. The mission of the Environmental Mechanics track is to provide students with the skills and concepts necessary to recognize the ways in which the natural environment acts to amplify or attenuate any perturbations to it. The program provides future industrial and political leaders with a scientific basis for assessing environmental impacts in addition to preparing students for graduate
study in allied fields.

Recommended REST subjects: 1.00, 1.018; REST subjects with reduced engineering: 12.003 (no engineering units), 12.102 (6 engineering units), 12.120 (6 engineering units)

Suggested Concentration Subjects

  • 1.018 Ecology I: The Earth System
  • 1.020 Ecology II: Engineering for Sustainability
  • 1.061 Transport Processes in the Environment
  • 1.070 Introduction to Hydrology
  • 1.071 Global Change Science
  • 1.080 Environmental Chemistry
  • 1.084 Systems Microbiology
  • 1.107 Environmental Chemistry and Biology Laboratory

Suggested Concentration Subjects with reduced engineering content

  • 12.009 Theoretical Environmental Analysis (6 engineering units)
  • 12.021 Earth Science, Energy, and the Environment (6 engineering units)
  • 12.086 Modeling Environmental Complexity (6 engineering units)
  • 12.102 Environmental Earth Science (6 engineering units)
  • 12.120 Environmental Earth Science Field Course (6 engineering units)
  • 12.214 Environmental Geophysics
  • 12.301 Past and Present Climate (no engineering units)
  • 12.306 Atmospheric Physics and Chemistry
  • 12.340 Global Warming Science
  • 12.348 Global Climate Change: Economics, Science, Policy (6 engineering units)

 

Industrial Design

Note that there are many excellent courses at MIT relevant to industrial design that do not necessarily include engineering content. We encourage 2-A students to take these classes and include them in their concentration however, since 2-A is an engineering degree, the student’s program must include at least 72 units of engineering beyond the required first and second level mechanical engineering subjects. This means that you must either:

  1. Include 72 units of engineering in your 2-A concentration OR
  2. Make up the difference by taking additional engineering courses (e.g. if your concentration includes 60 engineering units you must take an additional 12 unit class in course 1, 2, 3, 6, 10, 16, 20, or 22 to make up the difference.)

Suggested Subjects with full engineering content (i.e. for the courses listed below, the number of units is the same as the number of engineering units):

  • 2.007 Design and Manufacturing I
  • 2.008 Design and Manufacturing II
  • 2.739  Product Design and Development (GRAD)
  • 2.744 Product Design (GRAD)
  • 2.72 Elements of Mechanical Design
  • 2.729: D-Lab Design for Scale
  • 4.031 Design Studio: Objects and Interaction
  • 4.051 The Human Factor in Design Innovation & Strategy
  • 4.500 Introduction to Design Computing
  • 4.504 Design Scripting
  • 6.813 User Interface Design and Implementation (prereq 6.005)
  • 16.400 Human Systems Engineering
  • 6.902 Engineering Innovation and Design (GEL)
  • MAS.865 How to Make (Almost) Anything (GRAD)

Suggested subjects with reduced or no engineering content (the number of engineering units listed below are estimates; the exact number will be determined in the context of the student’s complete program. If no units are indicated, in general no engineering credit will be awarded for that particular class.) Many of these classes may be taken as HASS courses or unrestricted electives and we suggest them as a complement to the recommended concentration classes.

  • 4.022 Design Studio: Introduction to Design Techniques and Technologies (9 units)
  • 4.032 Design Studio: Information and Visualization
  • 4.301 Introduction to Artistic Experimentation*
  • 4.302 Foundations in Art, Design and Spatial Practices
  • 4.322 Introduction to Three-Dimensional Art Work (HASS-A)*
  • 4.602 Modern Art and Mass Culture (HASS-A, CI-H
  • MAS.131 Computational Camera and Photography (6 engineering units)
  • 4.344 Advanced Photography and Related Media (HASS-A)*
  • 4.352 Advanced Video and Related Media (HASS-A)*
  • 4.520 Visual Computing I
  • MAS.110 Fundamentals of Computational Media Design (HASS-A, CI-H)*

*Note:  no subject may count as both a HASS and a 2-A concentration subject.  Including a HASS subject in your concentration is only allowed if you take extra HASS subjects.

Learning Machines & Physical Systems

This track considers the intersection between physical and artificial machines by combining mechanical design and modeling with artificial intelligence, machine learning, and/or computation.

Recommended REST subjects:  6.00

Note: You may only include one introductory/REST subject in your concentration.  The following classes are introductory: 6.0001/6.00, 6.042 (REST)/18.200, 6.004 (REST), and 6.008.

Recommended Core Subjects

2.004 Dynamics and Control II

2.007 Design and Manufacturing

Suggested Concentration Subjects

You are encouraged to select subjects across categories:

Physical systems

2.12 Introduction to Robotics

2.74 Bio-inspired Robotics

2.008 Design and Manufacturing II

2.72 Elements of Mechanical Design

2.797[J] Molecular, Cellular, and Tissue Biomechanics

2.813 Energy, Materials, and Manufacturing

Controls

2.14 Analysis and Design of Feedback Control Systems

2.184 Biomechanics and Neural Control of Movement

2.151 Advanced System Dynamics and Control (GRAD)

2.153 Adaptive Control and Connections to Machine Learning (GRAD)

2.152[J] Nonlinear Control (GRAD)

Machine Learning, Artificial Intelligence and Computing

2.791[J] Cellular Neurophysiology and Computing

2.168 Learning Machines (GRAD)  *

6.009 Fundamentals of Programming

6.034 Artificial Intelligence

6.036 Introduction to Machine Learning

6.883 Advanced Topics in Artificial Intelligence

Mathematics

2.122 Stochastic Systems (GRAD) *

2.29 Numerical Fluid Mechanics (GRAD) *

18.05 Intro to Probability & Statistics -OR- 6.041A  Intro to Probability I + 6.041B  Intro to Probability II

18.06 Linear Algebra

18.075 Methods for Scientists and Engineers

 

Manufacturing

The advanced manufacturing track is for those interested in how advanced manufacturing, and product realization work in the modern world.  This includes how processes, automation, systems and design all interact to create the responsive production systems that world-class companies possess.   It is also a great way to prepare for entry into the ME Master of Engineering in Manufacturing degree program.  It is a broad track that includes design, controls, and systems, as well as processes and management.   This track would complement a Management minor focused on operation management.

Recommended Course 2 Subjects

  • 2.002 Mechanics and Materials II
  • 2.004 Dynamics and Control II

Suggested Concentration Subjects

  • 2.008 Design and Manufacturing II (STRONGLY RECOMMENDED)
  • 2.14 Analysis and Design of Feedback Control Systems
  • 2.12 Robotics
  • 2.72 Machine Design
  • 2.750 Precision Machine Design
  • 2.830 Manufacturing Process Control (GRAD)
  • 2.853 Introduction to Manufacturing Systems
  • 2.96 Management for Engineers
  • 2.888 Professional Seminar in Global Manufacturing Innovation and Entrepreneurship
  • 2.370 Fundamentals of Nanoengineering
  • 2.813 Energy, Materials and Manufacturing
  • 6.152J Micro/Nano Processing Technology
  • 15.075J Statistical Thinking and Data Analysis
  • 15.053 Optimization Methods in Management Science
  • 15.668 People and Organizations (no engineering units)
  • 15.724[J] Manufacturing System and Supply Chain Design (GRAD)

 

Mechanics

Recommended Course 2 Subjects

  • 2.002 Mechanics and Materials II
  • 2.004 Dynamics and Control II

Recommended Concentration Subjects

Computational Mechanics & Mechanics of Solid Materials

  • 2.092 Computer Methods in Dynamics
  • 18.330  Introduction to Numerical Analysis

Fluid Mechanics & Transport Phenomena

  • 2.006 Thermal-Fluids Engineering II
  • 2.016 Introduction to Marine Hydrodynamics
  • 2.51 Intermediate Heat and Mass Transfer
  • 2.672 Project Laboratory

Nonlinear Dynamics

  • 18.353 Nonlinear Dynamics I: Chaos
  • 18.354 (new number: 18.3541) Nonlinear Dynamics II: Continuum Systems

 

 

Nano/Micro Engineering

The 2-A Nanotrack is designed to bring students into the rapidly growing field of micro and nanotechnology while providing a strong foundation in mechanical engineering. Micro and nanotechnology have had and will continue to have a tremendous impact on a wide range of mechanical systems. Examples are microelectromechanical devices and systems that are already deployed as automobile airbag sensors and for drug delivery, stronger and lighter nanostructured materials now used in automobiles, nanostructured energy conversion devices that significantly improve the efficiency of macroscale energy systems, etc. Many faculty members in our department pursue research in micro and nano science and technology; this research cuts across mechanical engineering disciplines and other disciplines. Examples are sensors and actuators; fluidics, heat transfer, and energy conversion at the micro- and nanoscale; optical and biological micro- and nano-electromechanical systems (MEMS and NEMS); engineered three-dimensional nanomaterials; ultra-precision engineering; and the application of optics in measurement, sensing, and systems design. Courses offered in this track cover both fundamental theories and hands-on experience.

Strongly Recommended Concentration Subjects

  • 2.370 Molecular Mechanics
  • 2.772J Thermodynamics of Biomolecular Systems
  • 6.152J Micro/Nano Processing Technology

Additional Suggested Concentration Subjects

  • 1.021J Introduction to Modeling and Simulation
  • 2.180 Biomolecular Feedback Systems
  • 2.374J Design and Fabrication of Microelectromechanical Devices
  • 2.391J Submicrometer and Nanometer Technology (GRAD)
  • 2.500 Desalination and Water Purification (GRAD)
  • 2.570 Nano-to-Macro Transport Processes
  • 2.60 Fundamentals of Advanced Energy Conversion
  • 2.627 Fundamentals of Photovoltaics
  • 2.673 Instrumentation and Measurement for Biological Systems
  • 2.674 Micro/Nano Engineering Laboratory
  • 2.71 Optics
  • 2.715 Optical Microscopy and Spectroscopy for Biology and Medicine (GRAD)
  • 2.760 Multi-Scale System Design and Manufacturing
  • 2.793 Fields, Forces and Flows in Biological Systems
  • 2.ThU Undergraduate Thesis

 

 

Product Development [PD]

The mission of the Product Development Track (PD Track) is to prepare future leaders in engineering of new products. The PD Track includes many subjects from the school of management and is a good option for students interested in management careers or entrepreneurship. Major areas covered by the PD track include design, manufacturing, economics, marketing, organizational behavior, accounting, and intellectual property law. Further, the PD track curriculum is structured such that it is complementary to the Management minor offered by the Sloan School.

Students are encouraged to take 14.01: Principles of Microeconomic early in their career.  Since it is not an upper level course (and is a HASS), it cannot be counted in the concentration however, it is a prerequisite for other subjects essential to product development.

Recommended Course 2 Subjects

  • 2.002: Mechanics and Materials II – counts as 2.02A + 6 units in your concentration

Suggested Concentration Subjects

  • 15.301: Managerial Psychology Laboratory (which satisfies the institute lab requirement)
  • 15.812: Marketing Management (3 engineering units)
  • 15.501: Corporate Financial Accounting (9 engineering units)
  • 15.053: Optimization Methods in Management Science
  • 15.075: Statistical Thinking and Data Analysis
  • 2.008: Design and Manufacturing II
  • 2.72: Elements of Mechanical Design
  • 2.739J: Product Design and Development (GRAD)
  • 2.744: Product Design (GRAD)
  • 6.071: Electronics, Signals and Measurement
  • 6.041: Probabilistic Systems Analysis
  • 6.903J/15.628J: Patents, Copyrights, and the Law of Intellectual Property

In addition, students who are interested in designing electro-mechanical systems are encouraged to take classed in course 6 (e.g. 6.002). PD track students are encouraged to intern with design or manufacturing companies during the summer of their sophomore or junior years.

 

 

 

Sustainable and Global Development

 

Two tracks are possible in this program. One track, in Engineering for Sustainability, is intended for students interested in work on sustainability in the context of US industry or in other industrialized settings. The other track, in Engineering for International Development, is intended for students interested in applications of technology for the developing world. Many of the classes listed below are relevant to both US and International concentrations.

This track can be coupled to the minor programs in Environmental Engineering Science or Applied International Studies, as well as several HASS minors (recall that courses in your concentration may also be counted towards your minor).

One of the tricky aspects of putting together a 2-A curriculum in sustainability is that there are many excellent courses at MIT relevant to sustainability that do not necessarily include engineering content. We encourage 2-A students to take these classes and include them in their concentration however, since 2-A is an engineering degree, the student’s program must include at least 69 units of engineering beyond the required first and second level mechanical engineering subjects. This means that you must either:

  • Include 72 units of engineering in your 2-A concentration OR
  • Make up the difference by taking additional engineering courses (e.g. if your concentration includes 60 engineering units you must take an additional 9 or 12 unit class in course 1, 2, 3, 6, 10, 16, 20, or 22 to make up the difference.)

Recommended REST subjects: 2.66/4.42, 1.018; REST subjects with reduced engineering: 12.003 (no engineering units), 12.102 (6 engineering units), 12.120 (6 engineering units)

Suggested subjects with full engineering content (i.e. for the courses listed below, the number of units is the same as the number of engineering units):

Sustainable Development

  • 1.020: Ecology II: Engineering for Sustainability
  • 1.080/1.107: Environmental Chemistry and Biology
  • 2.500: Desalination and Water Purification (GRAD)
  • 2.650: Sustainable Energy
  • 2.66J Fundamentals of Energy in Buildings
  • 2.722: D-Lab: Design
  • 2.813: Environmentally Benign Design and Manufacturing
  • 3.080: Economic and Environmental Materials Selection
  • EC.711: D-Lab: Energy

Global Development

  • 1.020: Ecology II: Engineering for Sustainability
  • 1.080/1.107: Environmental Chemistry and Biology
  • 1.851J: Water and Sanitation Infrastructure in Developing Countries (GRAD)
  • 2.650: Sustainable Energy
  • 2.66J Fundamentals of Energy in Buildings
  • 2.722: D-Lab: Design
  • 2.813: Environmentally Benign Design and Manufacturing
  • 2.965J: International Supply Chain Management (GRAD)
  • 3.080: Economic and Environmental Materials Selection
  • EC.711: D-Lab: Energy
  • EC.721: Wheelchair Design in Developing Countries

Suggested subjects with limited or no engineering content (the number of engineering units listed below are estimates; the exact number will be determined in the context of the student’s complete program. If no units are indicated, in general no engineering credit will be awarded for that particular class.):

Both Sustainable and Global Development

  • 1.801J: Environmental Law, Policy, and Economics: Pollution Prevention and Control (HASS-S)*
  • 4.231J: SIGUS Workshop
  • 11.491J: Economic Development and Policy Analysis I (GRAD)
  • 11.601: Introduction to Environmental Policy and Planning — 3 engineering units (GRAD)
  • 14.42: Environmental Policy and Economics (HASS-S)*
  • 14.44: Energy Economics and Policy (HASS-S)*
  • 14.74: Foundations of Development Policy (I) (HASS-S)*
  • 14.771: Development Economics: Microeconomic Issues and Policy Models (GRAD)
  • 14.772: Development Economics: Macroeconomics (GRAD)
  • 17.181: Sustainable Development: Theory, Research and Policy (I) (HASS-S)*
  • 12.348J: Global Climate Change: Economics, Science and Policy — 6 engineering units
  • EC.701: D-Lab: Development (I) (HASS-S)*
  • EC.715: D-Lab: Disseminating Innovations for the Common Good (I)
  • MAS.665J: Development Ventures (GRAD)

*Note:  no subject may count as both a HASS and a 2-A concentration subject.  Including a HASS subject in your concentration is only allowed if you take extra HASS subjects.